8 Responses to “Conflicted nutritionists defend bread”

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  1. avatar Darren says:

    The fake British Nutrition Foundation has been known about for a long time. Goes along the same lines as McDonald’s sponsoring sports competitions….

    The bottom line is; if you want to eat healthily cook yourself and have a balanced diet. It really is that simple. But because no big company makes money from spouting that line, it drowned out with the ‘eat my product to make you feel good/loose weight/be healthy’.

    However, the ‘real’ healthy message folk are often their own worst enemies. As an example, the table Zoe shows tries to compare ‘wet’ foods, like Chicken Liver, with flour which is dry. Of course flour is going to have many more calories as there is no water to dilute it. How many calories in Chicken Liver if you dry it? I eat bread – albeit home baked – every day, but in moderation and part of a balanced diet. And I’m 119 years old.

  2. avatar Javed says:

    Hi Zoe, very nice article. About bread, whether the same holds true for the bread we make in our homes on the oven from wheat flour. This bread, as we call “chapatti” in Urdu here in Pakistan is a thin layered hand made round bread and cooked over a round shaped steel plate, called “tawa”.

    And what should be the alternative for sugar?

    Javed

  3. avatar fiona says:

    Hi Angela,have you tried Vogel bread? Maybe it’s not like home made, but it’s free from emulsifiers, enzymes or preservatives (hence it only lasts about 4 days in the fridge). I usually eat fresh/cook from fresh, and steer clear of anything with sugar and preservatives. If I want more denser carbs than fruit or veg I’ll go for brown rice and the occasional slice of Vogel bread.

  4. avatar Angela Jackson says:

    I don’t doubt anything you say. I eat lots of fruit, veges and fresh meat/fish. However, I still haven’t come up with an alternative to bread to keep my system functioning and not develop diverticulitis from a low carb diet.

  5. avatar Mark says:

    Hi Zoe,

    Excellent blog(s). It is great the way you tabulate the numbers it really hits home the nutrient content of the different foods we eat. Your table shows the protein content in chicken liver (149) higher than sardines (148) but sardines highlighted.
    “Did you know that the average UK citizen is consuming 1,150 calories a day from just two ingredients” this is incredible….
    Keep up the great work and thanks,

    Mark

  6. avatar india leigh says:

    Really interesting article. It amazes (enrages) me to discover the ‘names’ behind these organisations who tout the idea that they are a public service.

    I’d love to share the article but your ‘share’ service is not working. Please let me know if you rectify the problem.

    Thanks

    India Leigh

    • avatar Zoë says:

      Hi India – many thanks for the tip on the ‘share’ service – both hubby and I tried it and it’s slow (it’s a third party service – not to do with our site), but it did get there in the end!
      Many thanks for trying to share anyway
      Best wishes – Zoe

If you'd like to leave a comment, please do so openly and politely and no hiding behind some pseudonym. As for spam, well that's just another word for junk and it will end up in the bin, where it belongs.


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